RAISE 17 Conference

Presenting advice and guidelines

Paper Presentations – (30 minute slot)

Do not just read out a paper – participants can read! This is an opportunity to briefly present your main findings, ideas or issues and to get feedback, engage in discussion and allow participants to take away ideas for themselves.  It is recommended that the presentation should be 20 minutes maximum, allowing discussion for 10 minutes. – PowerPoint or Prezi also useful for producing slides to be used on an overhead projector – but you do have to use that!

– Generally PowerPoint is poorly used. It is useful for structuring presentations but also encourages the inclusion of too much information and the use of distracting effects. Ideally you should aim to use no more than 8-10 slides in a 20-minute presentation. Think of the slides as being there as a prompt or to provide an illustration, rather than a script which you then read out with minimal elaboration.

– Whether using PowerPoint an alternative presentation tool, use at least an 18-point font, use space effectively and think carefully about the colours you use. How are they going to look from the back of a lecture theatre?

– Use diagrams, tables, charts and even pictures to illustrate points

– Seminar Rooms are flat rooms that allow for interaction, or at least Q&A so do think about how you can best utilise the space in your presentation.

– We recommend checking your presentation timings before presenting at the conference.

 

Symposia – (55 minute slot)

The agenda for a symposium is a collection of paper presentations with a common and linking theme.  Have an introduction from one speaker followed by at least two further speakers (and preferably more although five is probably a sensible maximum. Try to five roughly equal time to each. They do need to brief and succinct enough to allow at 15 minutes for discussion and questions. The lead presenter should collaborate with the chair to direct questions to the appropriate presenters.

The same advice as given to paper presentations applies – always wise though to coordinate beforehand to avoid repetition and be coherent as a presenter team.

Workshops – (55 minute slot)

– Your role is to facilitate and not just to give an extended presentation. Participants should be active, engaged in lots of discussion and a workshop should provide the opportunity for individual reflection and action planning i.e. something they can take away to do later.

– Feedback from previous years strongly urged workshop facilitators to focus on interactive activities as there was often too much front-led presentation. Please be very aware of timings during your session as we want to improve this particular area this year.

– Work out what you want your participants to take away with them – not just paperwork, but what inspiration or ideas will change their practice?

– Think carefully about what you want people to do if you ask them to spend time working by themselves and in small groups.

Make your inputs short and focused.

– Keep some flexibility in your structure to allow for interesting asides which you had not thought about but which seem to be equally worth talking about. However, do not get too diverted by someone else’s hobby horse as this can be extremely irritating for those participants who came to engage with the topic as presented in the programme abstract.

– Have some additional activities up your sleeve in case some go more quickly than you anticipated or now seem inappropriate given the way the discussion has gone.

– Use whole-group plenaries to draw themes together rather than just having every subgroup reporting similar things. Poster tours can be very effective.

– Treat the time allowed as an upper limit, not a target! Allow time for summing up and closing with ‘what are you going to do as a result of this workshop?’

Workshops will be chaired to ensure time for activity and interaction is maximised. Chairs will check your intended timings and give warning if introductions run too long, etc.

Pecha Kucha – 7 minutes

– This is an opportunity to briefly present your main findings, ideas or issues.  A strict 7 minutes is timed, and then the chair will allow a couple of questions at the end of a round of presentations.

– PowerPoint or Prezi is crucial for communicating your key messages.

– Think of the slides as being there as a prompt or to provide an illustration, rather than a script which you then read out with minimal elaboration.

Use diagrams, tables, charts and pictures to illustrate points wherever possible instead of text

– Use at least an 18-point font, use space effectively and think carefully about the colours you use. How are they going to look from the back of a room?

– To get an idea of some fantastic PKs:

http://www.pechakucha.org/presentations/aliens-might-have-claimed-my-sisters – here’s a start, and there are lots of others on the website. These stick to a traditional 20x20 (slides x seconds) format. You may have as few slides as you would like! Don’t feel constrained to this.

– This is an exciting way of communicating your key messages and inviting people to connect with you personally after your presentation to further conversations.

We strongly recommend repeatedly practicing your timings for your 7 minutes. Chairs will need to interrupt you if you go over time!

Poster Presentation

You are invited to submit a poster proposal for consideration. The possibilities are wide open. We would like to hear about:

– Particular aspects of your work – solo or team – that you are especially enthusiastic about, and want to share

– Projects or initiatives where you would like to share ideas and get feedback

– Research, including accounts of research in progress

– Presentations about themes or concepts that you are exploring

– Student perspectives, including posters by students about their experience of student engagement

– Any aspect of your work where you are keen to share ideas and build links with colleagues at other universities or colleges.

 

The main restriction is the size of the poster. The maximum size is A1 (size of a flip chart). There is no restriction on content or format. The posters can range from:

o Professionally designed to freehand work

o Mainly text to mainly image-based

o Monochrome to multi-coloured

You will also need to prepare a 60 second overview of your poster for our speed-intro at the start of the poster session